Italy’s Stromboli volcano’s eruption was observed from space.

Less than five hours after the early-morning eruption of Italy’s Stromboli volcano on October 9, Europe’s Copernicus Earth-observing satellite Sentinel-2 captured a spectacular photograph of it.

Lava is seen pouring into the water while enormous plumes of smoke and ash are seen rising above the volcano in the image, which was processed in real colours. According to a statement from the European Space Agency (ESA), the eruption led to the partial collapse of the volcano’s crater terrace. The eruption also prompted the Italian civil protection authorities to issue an orange alert owing to the ongoing “condition of heightened volcanic imbalance.”

Related: How satellites have transformed volcano research

Near the northernmost point of the island of Sicily in the Tyrrhenian Sea, in southern Italy, lies the Stromboli volcano and the island that bears its name. The majority of the island’s 300 full-time residents reside in the village of Ginostra, which is visible in the satellite image to the southwest of the volcanic cone.

Its frequent eruptions over the past 90 years have made it one of the most active volcanoes on earth.

Near the northernmost point of the island of Sicily in the Tyrrhenian Sea, in southern Italy, lies the Stromboli volcano and the island that bears its name. The majority of the island’s 300 full-time residents reside in the village of Ginostra, which is visible in the satellite image to the southwest of the volcanic cone.

Its frequent eruptions over the past 90 years have made it one of the most active volcanoes on earth.

The Sentinel-2 mission is made up of the Sentinel-2A and Sentinel-2B Earth observation satellites, both of which are a component of the Copernicus Program sponsored by the European Union and the European Space Agency. The size of the most recent Nord Stream gas pipeline leak was determined with the help of the Sentinel-5P satellite.

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